Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11690/2178
Authors: Wolmeister, Anelise Schifino
Schiavo, Carolina Lourenzon
Nazário, Kahio César Kuntz
Castro, Stela Maris de Jezus
Souza, Andressa de
Caetani, Rafael Poli
Caumo, Wolnei
Stefani, Luciana Cadore
Title: The Brief Measure of Emotional Preoperative Stress (B-MEPS) as a new predictive tool for postoperative pain: a prospective observational cohort study
Keywords: Brief Measure of Emotional Preoperative Stress
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: PLoS ONE
Citation: WOLMEISTER, A. S. et al. The Brief Measure of Emotional Preoperative Stress (B-MEPS) as a new predictive tool for postoperative pain: a prospective observational cohort study. PLoS ONE, v. 15, n. 1, e0227441, 2020. Disponível em: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0227441. Acesso em: 14 set. 2021.
Abstract: Background Preoperative patients’ vulnerabilities such as physical, social, and psychological are implicated in postoperative pain variability. Nevertheless, it is a challenge to analyze a patient's psychological profile in the preoperative period in a practical and consistent way. Thus, we sought to identify if high preoperative emotional stress, evaluated by the Brief Measure of Emotional Preoperative Stress (B-MEPS) scale is associated with higher postoperative pain levels and poor rehabilitation in patients submitted to intermediate or major surgery. Moreover, the possible neurobiological or neurophysiological mechanisms implicated in high preoperative emotional stress, evaluated through preoperative quantitative sensory pain tests and serum biomarkers BDNF and S100B were investigated. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational, cohort study of ASA 2 and 3 adult patients undergoing major urologic, gynecologic, proctologic and orthopedic surgeries from March 2017 to March 2018. B-MEPS and Central Sensitivity Inventory were evaluated preoperatively, followed by a sequence of experimental pain tests and serum biomarkers collection. Postoperative evaluation carried out within the first 48 hours after surgery comprehended pain at rest and movement-evoked pain, and the consumption of morphine. Quality-of-Recovery was also evaluated in the 3rd postoperative day. Results 23 (15%) out of 150 patients included in the study presented high emotional preoperative stress. Variables significantly related to preoperative stress were: previous psychiatric diagnosis and Central Sensitization Inventory result. Mean movement-evoked pain in the first 12 to 48 hours was 95–105% higher than pain at rest. A mixed model for repeated measures showed a sustainable effect of B-MEPS as a movement-evoked pain predictor. Previous pain, cancer surgery, and preoperative pressure pain tolerance were also independent predictors of postoperative pain. Moderate to severe postoperative movement-evoked pain was predictive of poor rehabilitation in 48 hours after surgery. Conclusion We confirmed that a brief screening method of preoperative emotional states could detect individuals prone to experience severe postoperative pain. Specific interventions considering the stress level may be planned in the future to improve perioperative outcomes.
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